Author Archives: Charlie Woller

About Charlie Woller

Charlie Woller works as a technical trainer at LPi’s MidEast Region Service Center. He enjoys the opportunities to travel and to meet and work with customers which his job affords him. His greatest satisfaction comes from coaching customers on how best to take advantage of the publishing tools and resources available to them. During his spare time, Charlie likes to read (mysteries, thrillers, horror, quantum physics) and listen to classical music.

A Graphic Arts Glossary #5

This is the fifth post in a series. Watch this blog during the months to come for further installments in this ongoing series.

The purpose of the series is to define key terms used in the graphic arts industry.

The fifth term in the series is ellipsis.

Ellipsis: a series of marks (as) used to indicate an omission, a pause in speech, an unfinished thought, or, at the end of a sentence, a trailing off into silence. The most common form of ellipsis is a series of three dots.

Tip: to insert an ellipsis into a Microsoft Word or Microsoft Publisher document, simply type three (3) periods and press the space bar once. Word or Publisher will convert the three periods into an ellipsis.

The sixth term in the series will be font.

A Graphic Arts Glossary #4

This is the fourth post in a series. Watch this blog during the months to come for further installments in this ongoing series.

The purpose of the series is to define key terms used in the graphic arts industry.

The fourth term in the series is dot gain.

Dot gain: Dot gain is a phenomenon that causes printed material to look darker than intended. When ink, which is liquid and has a tendency to spread, is applied to paper, it is done using a series of dots. A halftone is an image (e.g., a photograph) composed of a pattern of dots. The dots create an optical illusion by varying in size so that the tone appears continuous when viewed from a distance. Bigger dots look darker and smaller dots look lighter. Dot gain occurs when some of the ink is absorbed by the paper causing the dots to expand in size. Because dot size is directly proportional to tone, this will make the image look darker overall.

The example above simulates the effect of dot gain on newspaper stock.

The fifth term in the series will be ellipsis.

A Graphic Arts Glossary #3

This is the third post in a series. Watch this blog during the months to come for further installments in this ongoing series.

The purpose of the series is to define key terms used in the graphic arts industry.

The third term in the series is color bars.

Color bars: A color test strip that is printed on the waste portion of a press sheet. It helps a press operator to monitor and control the quality of the printed material relative to ink density, registration and dot gain. It may also include a star target, which is designed to detect inking and press problems.

In the example above the four squares represent the four process colors: cyan, magenta, yellow, and black.

The fourth term in the series will be dot gain.

A Graphic Arts Glossary #2

This is the second post in a series. Watch this blog during the months to come for further installments in this ongoing series.

The purpose of the series is to define key terms used in the graphic arts industry.

The second term in the series is base line.

Base line: An imaginary horizontal line on which upper case letters, lower case letters, punctuation marks, etc., stand.

In the example above the base line is highlighted in red together with the ascenders.

The third term in the series will be color bars.

The image above is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

A Graphic Arts Glossary #1

This is the first post in a new series. Watch this blog during the months to come for further installments in this ongoing series.

The purpose of the series will be to define key terms used in the graphic arts industry.

The first term in the series is ascender.

Ascender: Any part of a letter which rises above the main body of the letter such as in “A,” “h” and “f.”


In the example above the ascenders are highlighted in red together with the base line.

The second term in the series will be base line.

The image above is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Stay in touch

Got a new email address? Email us and let us know so that we can keep our records up to date. We want to stay in touch. Please include your account number in all correspondence. It makes it easier for us to help you. Don’t know your account number? Call your local LPi service center. We enjoy hearing from you.

  • Milwaukee/Edina/Denver (accounts starting with 01, 02, and 05) 1-800-950-9952
  • Hartford CT/Rochester NY (accounts starting with 03, 04, and 06) 1-800-888-4574
  • Cleveland/Detroit (accounts starting with 14, and 15) 1-800-477-4574

LPi Art & Media Portal

From time to time a customer will call me and ask if there have been any updates to the old loose leaf, 3-ring clip art binder and accompanying disks. The binder and disks have been superseded by the LPi Art & Media Portal. You may continue to use the binder and disks. The Portal, however, is the most up-to-date and comprehensive source for clip art and other content. If LPi prints your bulletin, newsletter or directory, you already have an account. Call your LPi Service Center today for your login information. We’ll be happy to give you a quick tour of the Portal.

These Clips Are Made for Croppin’

The Summer, 2010, issue of Bright Ideas magazine includes several pieces of clip art that were created for you to crop. Check out the award ribbons on page 17. You can crop this clip to use only one of the colored ribbons.

Before

After

Take a look at the pie charts, flow charts and thermometer images on page 21. You can crop these clips, too, and use only the one you need.

All these clips can be retrieved on LPi’s Art & Media Portal by typing the code beneath the clip, e.g., su1013bi_4c, in the “Quick Search” box and clicking the “Search” button. Don’t forget to download the clip and save it to the “My Pictures” folder on your computer.

Follow the directions below to crop these pictures.

Microsoft Word 2003 and earlier

Select the picture that you want to crop.

When you select the picture, the Picture toolbar appears.

If the Picture toolbar does not appear, do the following:

  1. Click on View on the menu bar.
  2. Pull down to Toolbars.
  3. Slide to the right and click on Picture.

On the Picture toolbar, select the Crop tool.

Point at one of the crop marks surrounding the picture.

If no crop marks appear, do the following:

  1. Double click the picture.
  2. In the Format Picture dialog box, click the Layout tab.
  3. Click the icon for Square wrapping style.
  4. Select one of the four options for horizontal alignment.
  5. Click the OK button.

To crop the picture, do one of the following:

  • To crop one side of the picture, drag the center crop mark on that side.
  • To crop evenly on two sides at once, hold down the CTRL key as you drag a center crop mark.
  • To crop all four sides simultaneously and maintain the proportions of the picture, hold down the CTRL+SHIFT keys as you drag a corner crop mark.
  • To outcrop (or add white space) around a picture, drag a crop mark outward from the center of the picture.
Microsoft Office Word 2007

Select the picture that you want to crop.

Under Picture Tools, on the Format tab, in the Size group, click Crop.

Point at one of the crop marks surrounding the picture.

To crop the picture, do one of the following:

  • To crop one side of the picture, drag the center crop mark on that side.
  • To crop evenly on two sides at once, hold down the CTRL key as you drag a center crop mark.
  • To crop all four sides simultaneously and maintain the proportions of the picture, hold down the CTRL+SHIFT keys as you drag a corner crop mark.
  • To outcrop (or add white space) around a picture, drag a crop mark outward from the center of the picture.
Microsoft Publisher 2003

Select the picture that you want to crop.

When you select the picture, the Picture toolbar appears.

If the Picture toolbar does not appear, do the following:

  1. Click on View on the menu bar.
  2. Pull down to Toolbars.
  3. Slide to the right and click on Picture.

On the Picture toolbar, select the Crop tool.

Point at one of the crop marks surrounding the picture.

To crop the picture, do one of the following:

  • To crop one side of the picture, drag the center crop mark on that side.
  • To crop evenly on two sides at once, hold down the CTRL key as you drag a center crop mark.
  • To crop all four sides simultaneously and maintain the proportions of the picture, hold down the CTRL+SHIFT keys as you drag a corner crop mark.
  • To outcrop (or add white space) around a picture, drag a crop mark outward from the center of the picture.
Microsoft Publisher 2010

Select the picture that you want to crop.

Under Picture Tools, on the Format tab, in the Crop group, click Crop.

Point at one of the crop marks surrounding the picture.

To crop the picture, do one of the following:

  • To crop one side of the picture, drag the center crop mark on that side.
  • To crop evenly on two sides at once, hold down the CTRL key as you drag a center crop mark.
  • To crop all four sides simultaneously and maintain the proportions of the picture, hold down the CTRL+SHIFT keys as you drag a corner crop mark.
  • To outcrop (or add white space) around a picture, drag a crop mark outward from the center of the picture.

Please consult the manual or help feature for your specific program for more information about cropping pictures.

Just in case…

Ever need to convert a large block of text from upper case to lower case or vice versa? It’s a piece of cake. Just follow the directions below.

Microsoft Word 2003 and earlier
  1. Select the text that you want to change.
  2. Click on Format on the menu bar.
  3. Pull down and click on Change Case…
  4. Select one of the five options.
  5. Click the OK button.
Microsoft Office Word 2007
  1. Select the text that you want to change.
  2. Click on the Home tab.
  3. In the Font group click Change Case.
  4. Select one of the five options.
Microsoft Publisher
  1. Click on Edit on the menu bar.
  2. Pull down and click on Edit Story in Microsoft Word.
  3. Select the text that you want to change.
  4. Click on Format on the menu bar.
  5. Pull down and click on Change Case…
  6. Select one of the five options.
  7. Click the OK button.
  8. Click on File on the menu bar.
  9. Pull down and click on Close & Return to [your publication name].

Safeguard your software

Software is a valuable commodity. No doubt you’ve invested a lot of money in software. Protect that investment.

CDs left out on a desk attract sticky fingers. When was the last time you searched for a CD and couldn’t find it? It seems like CDs have a habit of walking away or disappearing into thin air.

After use, installation CDs for programs like Microsoft Office and Adobe Acrobat should be placed in a safe, secure, and if possible, fireproof location such as a safe or vault. Some organizations go even further and make arrangements to store their software off-site, e.g., in a safe deposit box at a bank.

Consider placing your CDs and the accompanying documentation for each of your workstations in a separate container or plastic storage bag. Label each container or bag, e.g., “Front Desk Workstation,” so that you know which CDs belong to which workstation.

Many companies now charge for replacement CDs. Avoid an unnecessary expense. Safeguard your software.