Category Archives: Microsoft Word

A Graphic Arts Glossary #6

This is the sixth post in a series. Watch this blog during the months to come for further installments in this ongoing series.

The purpose of the series is to define key terms used in the graphic arts industry.

The sixth term in the series is font.

Font: a complete set of upper and lower case letters, numerals, punctuation marks, and symbols of one specific typeface, size and style. Arial Bold 12-point is an example of a font.

A typeface is a set of characters which share common design features. Garamond is an example of a typeface. With the advent of digital typesetting, the two words “font” and “typeface” have come to be used interchangeably.

A font family is a set of fonts related to a basic typeface. A font family includes bold, italic, and bold-italic styles plus a range of sizes, weights and widths.

The seventh term in the series will be grain.

That Looks Familiar – Duplicating Images

Sometimes it just makes sense to use the same piece of clip art multiple times. If you’re creating string to separate two articles, if you want to frame an article title, or if you just want to decorate a page with a specific type of item. However, having to insert, resize and position the exact same image multiple times can get a bit taxing. Many publishing programs have a shortcut for duplicating any item within your document.

In Publisher and Word, that short cut is to hold the Control key and then click and drag the object. When you are holding the Control key and move the cursor over an image it generally changes the cursor to include a “+” symbol and a box, this will look a lot like the image shown to the right. From there, if you click and drag the image, it will create an exact duplicate in the location you drop it!

This little trick will most certainly come in handy when creating borders, highlighting articles, or filling a page with stars and snowflakes.

A Graphic Arts Glossary #5

This is the fifth post in a series. Watch this blog during the months to come for further installments in this ongoing series.

The purpose of the series is to define key terms used in the graphic arts industry.

The fifth term in the series is ellipsis.

Ellipsis: a series of marks (as) used to indicate an omission, a pause in speech, an unfinished thought, or, at the end of a sentence, a trailing off into silence. The most common form of ellipsis is a series of three dots.

Tip: to insert an ellipsis into a Microsoft Word or Microsoft Publisher document, simply type three (3) periods and press the space bar once. Word or Publisher will convert the three periods into an ellipsis.

The sixth term in the series will be font.

Are your fonts hidden?

Your document is ready to go, you breathe a sigh of relief; the only thing left is to print it out for the final proof. You print out the file, but something looks off. You look closer and see that there is information missing, but when you look at the screen it’s all there. Where did the text go? Has this ever happened to you?

The culprit behind this missing text could be a font attribute called “Hidden”

Most font attributes add something to what you are typing whether it’s a strikethrough, superscript, etc… The Hidden attribute, on the other hand, makes it disappear completely when you look at a print preview or print the document. Fixing this is actually easier than you might think.

First, we need to access the font attributes.  In order to do this we will highlight the block of text that is not printing out.  Once we have that selected we can right click on the highlighted text and select the “Font” option.  Next, we can un-check the “Hidden” option as seen to the right, and click OK.  With that, you should be good to go.

How does it all fit? Working with Clip Art.

In the past we have discussed how to build up your clip art library and then how to modify images to fit your needs (within the bounds of copyrights as was discussed in another post,) but now comes the tricky part of getting these images into your publication.

There are a few formatting options available for images.  Anyone working with images in Word knows the first option “In Line with Text.”  This is the default setting for any images that are inserted into a word document, but it is generally unfavorable because it often takes up a lot of room unnecessarily.  So how do we fix this?

First, if you right click on the image a series of options will open up, one of which will say “Format Picture”  This will open a formatting window, if we click on the Layout tab we will see the Text Wrapping options.  (In later versions of word the Text Wrapping options are accessible just by right clicking the image.)  Remember this Formatting screen as we will refer to it later.

Of the options that are available, Square is most likely the choice we are looking for.  This will allow us to move the image freely and will let the text fill the white space on either side of the image (this is the default picture setting in Publisher.)

There are a lot of other options available to us, for instance, lets say we want our graphic behind the text.  In word, we can either use the “Behind Text” option from the “format Picture” screen, or else we can just right click the image and there is an option available for “Send to Back” and “Send Behind Text,” similarly in publisher, you can right click, select “Object Order” and “Send to Back.  Generally this format is used for watermarks and should be done very sparingly and only with lighter images so that it doesn’t interfere with the text on top.  Also overuse of watermarks or images behind text can make your publication look very busy and make it harder to read.

These are only a couple of options available to help your graphics work with the text.  Don’t be afraid to play with the available options and see what you can do

Microsoft Put a Ribbon on Office 2007 and 2010

Introduced as a way to make our tasks easier in 2007, with the exclusion of Publisher 2007 (which is why some of you will find this a surprise), Microsoft Office released a new version of their office suite with a new look and feel. This change was the addition of a Ribbon to replace the normal menu bar. A few months ago, Microsoft released their 2010 version of Office, this time including the Ribbon to the Publisher program.

For those who haven’t upgraded yet (either to Office 2007 or Publisher 2010), the Microsoft Ribbon uses graphical representations to display the most commonly used functions.

For example, if you wanted to insert a picture from your computer into your Word or Publisher document, you would simply have clicked the Insert menu command, chose “Picture” and selected “From file”. It’s straightforward only because we’re so used to it.

Change is difficult but the Ribbon is very nice for people (like me) that appreciate graphics and simple, one click functions. It’s like LPi Express (coming soon if you don’t already use it for uploading documents to us). It was different and odd at first, but once our editors realized how much easier it was to submit documents – no more creating .pdfs then having to browse separately – there was no more nervousness.

There are still functions I can’t always readily find. And for this I turn to a handy little interactive guide Microsoft invented. Obviously I am not the only one needing a bit of help! The link is below.

http://office.microsoft.com/en-gb/outlook-help/learn-where-menu-and-toolbar-commands-are-in-office-2010-and-related-products-HA101794130.aspx?CTT=1

In the meantime, I encourage you to give Office 2007 or 2010 a try. Graphically it’s more organized and once you’ve gotten used to where things are you’ll realize the best way to improve something is simply to put a Ribbon on it.

These Clips Are Made for Croppin’

The Summer, 2010, issue of Bright Ideas magazine includes several pieces of clip art that were created for you to crop. Check out the award ribbons on page 17. You can crop this clip to use only one of the colored ribbons.

Before

After

Take a look at the pie charts, flow charts and thermometer images on page 21. You can crop these clips, too, and use only the one you need.

All these clips can be retrieved on LPi’s Art & Media Portal by typing the code beneath the clip, e.g., su1013bi_4c, in the “Quick Search” box and clicking the “Search” button. Don’t forget to download the clip and save it to the “My Pictures” folder on your computer.

Follow the directions below to crop these pictures.

Microsoft Word 2003 and earlier

Select the picture that you want to crop.

When you select the picture, the Picture toolbar appears.

If the Picture toolbar does not appear, do the following:

  1. Click on View on the menu bar.
  2. Pull down to Toolbars.
  3. Slide to the right and click on Picture.

On the Picture toolbar, select the Crop tool.

Point at one of the crop marks surrounding the picture.

If no crop marks appear, do the following:

  1. Double click the picture.
  2. In the Format Picture dialog box, click the Layout tab.
  3. Click the icon for Square wrapping style.
  4. Select one of the four options for horizontal alignment.
  5. Click the OK button.

To crop the picture, do one of the following:

  • To crop one side of the picture, drag the center crop mark on that side.
  • To crop evenly on two sides at once, hold down the CTRL key as you drag a center crop mark.
  • To crop all four sides simultaneously and maintain the proportions of the picture, hold down the CTRL+SHIFT keys as you drag a corner crop mark.
  • To outcrop (or add white space) around a picture, drag a crop mark outward from the center of the picture.
Microsoft Office Word 2007

Select the picture that you want to crop.

Under Picture Tools, on the Format tab, in the Size group, click Crop.

Point at one of the crop marks surrounding the picture.

To crop the picture, do one of the following:

  • To crop one side of the picture, drag the center crop mark on that side.
  • To crop evenly on two sides at once, hold down the CTRL key as you drag a center crop mark.
  • To crop all four sides simultaneously and maintain the proportions of the picture, hold down the CTRL+SHIFT keys as you drag a corner crop mark.
  • To outcrop (or add white space) around a picture, drag a crop mark outward from the center of the picture.
Microsoft Publisher 2003

Select the picture that you want to crop.

When you select the picture, the Picture toolbar appears.

If the Picture toolbar does not appear, do the following:

  1. Click on View on the menu bar.
  2. Pull down to Toolbars.
  3. Slide to the right and click on Picture.

On the Picture toolbar, select the Crop tool.

Point at one of the crop marks surrounding the picture.

To crop the picture, do one of the following:

  • To crop one side of the picture, drag the center crop mark on that side.
  • To crop evenly on two sides at once, hold down the CTRL key as you drag a center crop mark.
  • To crop all four sides simultaneously and maintain the proportions of the picture, hold down the CTRL+SHIFT keys as you drag a corner crop mark.
  • To outcrop (or add white space) around a picture, drag a crop mark outward from the center of the picture.
Microsoft Publisher 2010

Select the picture that you want to crop.

Under Picture Tools, on the Format tab, in the Crop group, click Crop.

Point at one of the crop marks surrounding the picture.

To crop the picture, do one of the following:

  • To crop one side of the picture, drag the center crop mark on that side.
  • To crop evenly on two sides at once, hold down the CTRL key as you drag a center crop mark.
  • To crop all four sides simultaneously and maintain the proportions of the picture, hold down the CTRL+SHIFT keys as you drag a corner crop mark.
  • To outcrop (or add white space) around a picture, drag a crop mark outward from the center of the picture.

Please consult the manual or help feature for your specific program for more information about cropping pictures.

Just in case…

Ever need to convert a large block of text from upper case to lower case or vice versa? It’s a piece of cake. Just follow the directions below.

Microsoft Word 2003 and earlier
  1. Select the text that you want to change.
  2. Click on Format on the menu bar.
  3. Pull down and click on Change Case…
  4. Select one of the five options.
  5. Click the OK button.
Microsoft Office Word 2007
  1. Select the text that you want to change.
  2. Click on the Home tab.
  3. In the Font group click Change Case.
  4. Select one of the five options.
Microsoft Publisher
  1. Click on Edit on the menu bar.
  2. Pull down and click on Edit Story in Microsoft Word.
  3. Select the text that you want to change.
  4. Click on Format on the menu bar.
  5. Pull down and click on Change Case…
  6. Select one of the five options.
  7. Click the OK button.
  8. Click on File on the menu bar.
  9. Pull down and click on Close & Return to [your publication name].

The elusive pilcrow

Have you seen the elusive pilcrow? It’s not a rare tropical bird or exotic flower. The pilcrow is a typographical character commonly used to indicate the end of a paragraph. It looks like this ¶ (the actual size and shape depend on the typeface you’re using).

If you don’t see pilcrows at the ends of the paragraphs in your document, you may need to turn on the display of special characters (also called formatting marks).

To turn on the display of special characters in Microsoft Publisher, do the following:

  1. Click “View” on the menu.
  2. Pull down and click on “Special Characters.”

To turn on the display of formatting marks in Microsoft Word, do the following:

  1. Click “Tools” on the menu bar.
  2. Pull down and click on “Options.”
  3. Click the “View” tab.
  4. Check the box next to “Paragraph marks.”
  5. Click the OK button.

In Word 2007, click the “Show/Hide ¶” button in the Paragraph group on the Home tab.

To hide the pilcrows, just reverse the directions above.

When you turn on the display of special characters or formatting marks, you may also see other strange characters or marks. A chart listing the most common appears below.

Formattingmarkschart

Why would you want to view the pilcrow and its cousins? Viewing special characters or formatting marks can help you troubleshoot documents with problems. As Suzanne Barnhill and Dave Rado, two Microsoft MVPs, recommend, it’s a good policy to proofread your document twice: once, with special characters or formatting marks hidden, for content; and the second time with special characters or formatting marks displayed so that you can check for extra spaces, tabs, etc.

For more information about the pilcrow and other formatting marks, click here.

Tyrannosaurus Thesaurus

What’s another word for… ?

workingIf you are like many bulletin and newsletter editors, you sometimes have to write your own articles. Sometimes, inspiration is lacking. Have your ever used the same word too many times in a paragraph?

In the old days, you could go to the thesaurus and look up a word. The thesaurus would give you a nice list of words that mean about the same thing. And if you didn’t know what those other words meant, you could look them up in a dictionary. Now that you have a computer on your desk, you probably don’t keep a dictionary or thesaurus handy.

Here is how to make Microsoft Office, serve as your reference:

Type a word into either Microsoft Word or Publisher. Hold down the Alt key while you click one time on the word in question. The “Research” Task Pane will open on the left edge of your screen.

In this Task Pane, you will see:

dictionary, including pronunciation, and where to divide the word for hyphenation

thesaurus, listing of words with similar meanings

translation, a quick translation of a word into Spanish, Polish, Greek, or several other languages (for instance, I just found out that the Spanish word for “dictionary” is “diccionario”. )

Of course, if you have any problems, you could look that up, too.